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Johnny Tremain (1957)

Johnny Tremain (1957)

Movie Review

Adapted from the Newbery Medal winning book by Esther Forbes, this family classic is one of Disney’s better live action movies.

Johnny Tremain tells the story of a young silversmith apprentice (Hal Stalmaster) in pre-revolutionary Boston. While working on the Sabbath (illegal at the time) Johnny injures his hand and is forced to seek work (unsuccessfully) elsewhere.

In despair he approaches wealthy merchant and British sympathizer Jonathan Lyte (a beardless Sebastian Cabot, remember Mr. French from Family Affair?) Johnny’s mother left him a cup that would identify him as a member of the Lyte family but with a warning to only appeal to the Lyte’s in case of extreme despair. Johnny’s circumstances are quite desperate but the heartless Mr. Lyte rather than acknowledge Johnny as his nephew claims the cup was recently stolen and has him arrested.

Johnny is successfully defended by Josiah Quincy (Whit Bissell), a member of the Sons of Liberty; a movement for American independence. Johnny now joins the Sons of Liberty and even participates in the Boston Tea Party as well as the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Along the way he befriends American historic luminaries such as Paul Revere and Samuel Adams.

This is real nostalgia fare of the wholesome Americana films Disney put out during the 1950’s. I especially recommend it to those with children who would like to share and re-experience this Disney classic with them.


To view Johnny Tremain on Instant Amazon click on the following link.

To own your own copy on DVD from either Amazon USA, or Amazon Canada click on one of the corresponding links below.

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