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Tony Rome (1967)

Tony Rome (1967)
Movie Review Evocative of a Raymond Chandler mystery populated with sleazy characters and the troubled offspring of the wealthy, Tony Rome is an entertaining whodunit set in sunny Miami Beach. Frank Sinatra stars in the lead role as a former cop turned private investigator who lives on a houseboat (when he’s not placing bets with his bookie) in the first of a series of retro hardboiled detective movies filmed in the late 1960’s. Daughter Nancy sings the title track. When his former partner Ralph Turpin (Robert J. Wilke) calls in a favor to remove a drunk and unconscious Diana Pines nee Kosterman (Sue...
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Dirty Harry (1971)

Dirty Harry (1971)
  Movie Review   I think most movie buffs would agree that the Daddy of all badass cop flicks is Dirty Harry. Considered controversial and quite violent at the time of its release, some critics dismissed it as “reactionary” and some such as Roger Ebert went so far as to describe it as “fascist”. To be sure there are some reactionary elements to Inspector “Dirty Harry” Callahan’s (Clint Eastwood) views on police procedural vis a vis the rights of alleged perpetrators and the rights of victims. But the movie also reflects its time and the fears and concerns of American society at large as well...
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The Killing (1956)

The Killing (1956)
Movie Review Is it film noir or not? Some critics claim that it is while others argue that Stanley Kubrick was trying to make it too many things at once for the movie to be truly considered film noir. Who cares? The Killing is a GREAT heist movie! Quentin Tarantino has admitted to the influence this film had on his own Reservoir Dogs. I loved The Killing the first time I saw it and couldn’t believe that Kubrick was only 27 years old at the time he directed it and that this was only his second film. Told in a non-linear fashion with great dialogue written by Jim Thompson. Yes THAT Jim Thompson! The...
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Clash of the Titans (1981)

Clash of the Titans (1981)
Movie Review Another childhood favorite of mine, Clash of the Titans was the last movie Ray Harryhausen worked on. Though I was already fascinated with Greek mythology as a youngster this film further fueled my curiosity. In his first starring role, a very young and beautiful Harry Hamlin has the lead role of Perseus, mortal son of Zeus (Laurence Olivier) and slayer of monsters. Perseus is also the heir to the Kingdom of Argos. As the film opens we see his grandfather, King Acrisius forcing the infant Perseus along with his mother Danae into a wooden sarcophagus and flinging them into the sea. King...
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Black Moon (1975)

Black Moon (1975)
Movie Review At last available on DVD, Black Moon is perhaps Louis Malle’s least known work but according to the director himself, his most personal. The most accurate description one can give of this bizarre film is that it is the visual experience of watching someone else’s unconscious dream on celluloid, which in fact it is. Filmed entirely at Louis Malle’s manor estate in the Dordogne Valley, the director first conceived of Black Moon while filming Lecombe Lucien with German actress Therese Giehse. Malle had mentioned to Giehse that he wanted her to star in a future project of his to which the...
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Johnny Tremain (1957)

Johnny Tremain (1957)
Movie Review Adapted from the Newbery Medal winning book by Esther Forbes, this family classic is one of Disney’s better live action movies. Johnny Tremain tells the story of a young silversmith apprentice (Hal Stalmaster) in pre-revolutionary Boston. While working on the Sabbath (illegal at the time) Johnny injures his hand and is forced to seek work (unsuccessfully) elsewhere. In despair he approaches wealthy merchant and British sympathizer Jonathan Lyte (a beardless Sebastian Cabot, remember Mr. French from Family Affair?) Johnny’s mother left him a cup that would identify him as a member of the...
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